Whether you work in a warehouse, factory, construction site or somewhere else, you may need to reach areas far above your head. Fortunately, your employer likely has a few ladders to help you accomplish your job duties. 

Ladder accidents are a leading cause of both injury and death in Georgia’s many workplaces. Here are four ways your work ladder may put your health at risk. 

1. The ladder’s size

Ladders come in a seemingly endless number of sizes. If you use a ladder that is too tall or too short, you may be asking for trouble. Accordingly, if the correct ladder is not available, you should wait to do the project until you have an appropriate one. 

2. The ladder’s placement

Most ladders have feet that grip the surface. These feet keep the ladder from falling out from under you. If you place the ladder on a slippery or uneven surface, the feet simply cannot do their job. 

Properly placing equipment is about more than the ladder’s feet, though. Before setting up yours, check above your head for electrical wires and other potential hazards. 

3. The ladder’s condition

Even though you are busy at work, you should never use a ladder that is not in perfect condition. Dents, bends and other damage can weaken any ladder. Also, if your equipment is missing rungs or safety ropes, it may not support your weight. 

Accordingly, before using any ladder, you should always inspect it. If you see signs of damage or wear and tear, stay off the ladder. 

4. The ladder’s usage

All ladders have weight and other limitations you must respect. Before choosing a ladder for your work project, be sure you understand its intended purpose. Often, manufacturer’s print usage instructions on the side of the ladder. If they are not there, you may be able to find them in the owner’s manual or online. 

Even if you choose the right ladder and place it correctly, you may injure yourself if you use equipment incorrectly. Remember, not every ladder is right for every job you must accomplish.